Healthy Asian Youth

Healthy Asian Youth

Asian Americans are often characterized as a hardworking, wealthy, smart, and docile group who have a greater tendency to achieve in both school and society. This “model minority” myth emerged from stereotypes of persons of East Asian backgrounds, overlooking a disproportionate number of underprivileged Southeast Asian students and community members. 
Significant educational inequalities exist within the Asian American community. For example, approximately 37.5% of Laotian, 38.5% of Cambodian, 30% of Vietnamese, and 38.3% of Hmong aged 25 and over did not have a high school diploma or equivalent in 2009. While African Americans are traditionally believed to perform less well academically in the American society, only about 20% of them are in the same situations. Disparities in education also involve gender and background. Much more foreign-born Asian Americans do not have high school education compared to native-born Asian Americans. Particularly, this population consists of nearly 20% foreign-born females, while only 5% native-born females are facing the same challenge.
Economic conditions in low-income neighborhoods are an important factor that impairs the academic performance of Southeast Asian students. Subgroups such as Vietnamese Americans are economically more vulnerable than other groups of the Asian American community. While poverty could impede them from accessing to sufficient and high-quality education, exposure to violence in poor communities exerts a negative influence on their wellbeing as well. 
In addition, parents of Southeast Asian backgrounds who have limited English proficiency are likely to create a linguistically isolated environment for their children, even including those born in the U.S. Some may also have limited educational attainment, which causes problems for the families to engage in the school system. Due to language barriers as well as unfamiliarity with western environment, these parents are often unable to effectively participate in PTA meetings or to provide their children with guidance in schoolwork. As a result, their children may experience difficulties understanding the materials when they first attend school.

The Healthy Asian Youth (HAY) is an afterschool and summer program that recognizes the educational needs of underserved students in grades K-12. It welcomes kids of all backgrounds and races, providing them with tutoring, mentoring, leadership training, and other educational services. For grades K-6, HAY offers reading, mathematics, art, sciences, and computer enrichment classes. For grades 7-12, it focuses on violence prevention programs, college and career workshops, and SAT/ACT preparatory classes. It also provides unique opportunities for students to engage in recreational activities, including breakdancing, sports, arts and crafts, and field trips.​
 

HAY 1: Upper Arlington Children (K-6)

Math, Reading, Culture, Science, and Health Enrichment Course
Tutoring and Mentoring Services
Mondays and Thursdays
4:30pm-6:45pm
AACS Office (4700 Reed Rd. Columbus, OH 43220)

HAY 2: West Side Children (K-6):

Math, Reading, Culture, Science, and Health Enrichment Course
Tutoring and Mentoring Services
Wednesdays and Fridays
4:30pm-6:45pm
Glenwood Recreation Center (1925 W. Broad St. Columbus, OH 43223)

Teen HAY: West Side Teenagers (7-12):

SAT/ACT/OGT Preparatory Course, College and Career Development, Community Service Projects
Tuesdays
4:30pm-6:45pm
Glenwood Recreation Center (1925 W. Broad St. Columbus, OH 43223)

To Register a Child, Please Contact:

Daniel "Danny" Nam
Phone: 614-203-7474
E-mail: dnam@aacsohio.org

To Volunteer, Please Contact: 

Franchesca Brown
Phone: 216-732-1570
E-mail: fbrown@aacsohio.org


Connect with AACS
4700 Reed Road, Suite B, Upper Arlington, OH 43220
Phone:614.220.4023
Fax:614.220.4024
Interpreting Hotline:614-216-4988